Schedule

"Observation and Imagination" An evening of true stories told live.

Wednesday, November 6, is a storytelling night held in conjunction with the exhibit:
"Observation and Imagination" - curated by Clifford S. Ackley from the Museum of Fine Art, Boston, Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Curator of Prints and Drawings

In the Concord Art Main Gallery, 7:30pm. Concord Art and Fugitive Stories present a non-competitive storytelling and fundraising event. 

Curator Talk with Cliff Ackley - A Personal View

Wenesday, November 13, 6:30pm
A Personal View: Works in the Museum of Fine Art Collection that resonate with works by artists in Observation & Imagination with Clifford S. Ackley, Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Curator of Prints and Drawings.

Join us for an exciting and informative talk given by Clifford S. Ackley, the Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Curator of Prints and Drawings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Descriptions

"Observation and Imagination" An evening of true stories told live.

“Observation and Imagination" FUGITIVE Productions and Concord Art present: MOTH-INSPIRED TRUE STORIES TOLD LIVE...a fundraising event for Concord Art.

When: Wednesday, November 6, 2019, 7:30pm in the Main Gallery at Concord Art

What: Concord Art and Fugitive Stories present a non-competitive storytelling event. 

Theme: Observation and Imagination"

$12 Advanced Ticket Price • $15 At the Door

WHY STORYTELLING MATTERS

“Stories make us more alive, more human, more courageous, more loving.” — Madeleine L’Engle

We are hard-wired, perhaps at a genetic level, to tell and listen to stories. Stories pass a legacy between generations and are a way in which we form relationships in the here and now. While storytelling is entertainment, it is so much more. It is an art form as old as humanity. It is the primary way that we relate to each other to create kinship and community. Storytelling is a way in which we give a bit of ourselves to others and a way in which we feel less alone. Humanity’s earliest stories were about survival, hope, loss, love, and courage. Today’s stories echo the same themes.

Fugitive Stories brings the craft of true stories told live to suburban audiences. In each location (Acton, Arlington, Framingham — and now, Concord), Fugitive brings featured storytellers to tell a true tale alongside people just like you who may never have told a story on a stage but are inspired by one of our themes. Fugitive’s featured tellers captivate our audiences — they are some of the best in the country. Most are Moth StorySLAM winners and many are GrandSLAM champions. We also invite audience members who are interested in telling a five- to six-minute story on our theme to drop their name in our hat  — we pull a name or two after intermission. Each night is unique and they never fail to entertain.

Hearing a true story in a live performance is fun, moving and transformative. Fugitive Stories evenings Intimately reveal what we all have in common, making people feel more human and more alive. You’ll laugh and sometimes shed a few tears. Every event opens a door to a memory, a new friend or to your heart.

Learn more about Fugitive Stories at www.FugitiveStories.com.

Wednesday, November 6, is a storytelling night held in conjunction with the exhibit:
"Observation and Imagination" - curated by Clifford S. Ackley from the Museum of Fine Art, Boston, Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Curator of Prints and Drawings

In the Concord Art Main Gallery, 7:30pm. Concord Art and Fugitive Stories present a non-competitive storytelling and fundraising event. 

Register

Curator Talk with Cliff Ackley - A Personal View

A Personal View: Works in the Museum of Fine Art Collection that resonate with works by artists in Observation & Imagination with Clifford S. Ackley, Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Curator of Prints and Drawings.

Wednesday, November 13, 6:30pm

Join us for an exciting and informative talk given by Clifford S. Ackley, the Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Curator of Prints and Drawings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Notes from the Curator:

Observation & Imagination: Works on Paper

In 2017 artist Joel Janowitz invited me to the Concord Center for the Visual Arts to see the group show he had organized of contemporary painting with the unifying theme Space as Narrative. I was very taken with the show as well as with the program of the Center itself. While there, I met the director of the Center, Kate James, who asked if I would be interested in doing a show for them. I indicated that I might be willing to do an exhibition of works on paper by some of the Boston area artists whose work I had been following for a number of years. We also settled on a provisional future date for the show. Shortly thereafter, I went through a period of uncertain health that kept me out of circulation for a year. When things improved, I was reminded of my commitment to the exhibition and quickly came up with a list of fifteen Boston area artists for whom works on paper played a significant or central role in their work. Rather than striving for any thematic unity beyond “works on paper by Boston area artists” the exhibition is conceived as fifteen small one-person shows. Recent work is favored, but in certain instances older works have been included.

Why works on paper? For the last fifty years I have recommended for acquisition and curated exhibitions of prints, drawings and photographs at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Hired in 1966 to work with Old Master prints and drawings, in particular the etchings of Rembrandt. I brought with me an unexpected interest in modern and contemporary prints, drawings and photographs.

In graduate school I had been encouraged to consider museum work because of my preference for a wide-ranging, eclectic approach to art rather than a more specialized academic one. The Museum’s collection of prints, drawings and photographs that ranges from the fifteenth century to the present day seemed a promising way in which to satisfy my avid visual curiosity. There was also my commitment to the object, to the way the object was made, and to the messages encoded in the object itself rather than in intellectual theories about it. My idea of “conceptual” art is personified in the work of Jasper Johns where there is something to look at as well as something to think about.

I trust that the artists and works shown here justify at least in part my self-proclaimed breadth of interest. At one extreme there are drawings made direct from nature or  prints traditional in their use of printmaking media, but the selection is more generally characterized by hybrid works: drawings from photographs; collages from found or appropriated images; varying degrees of abstraction, from pure geometry to echoes of architectural structures; mark-making assisted by templates or stencils as well as free-hand gesture and a great variety of unique prints, monotypes and monoprints that hover somewhere between painting, drawing and printmaking.

And finally, it is notable that in virtually all the works exhibited here one can observe a lively intermingling of Observation and Imagination – to better delight both eye and mind.

Clifford S. Ackley

Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro

Curator of Prints and Drawings

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Wenesday, November 13, 6:30pm
A Personal View: Works in the Museum of Fine Art Collection that resonate with works by artists in Observation & Imagination with Clifford S. Ackley, Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Curator of Prints and Drawings.

Join us for an exciting and informative talk given by Clifford S. Ackley, the Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Curator of Prints and Drawings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Register